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TBWA's brain booty and disruptive interestingness across creative culture and media arts.

Curated by Abbey Dethlefs.

Founded by Maria Popova, editor of Brain Pickings.

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Stunning.
jtotheizzoe:

Lenticular and wave clouds are cool, but they don’t hold a candle to the undulatus asperatus clouds. Not new, but new to science, its Latin name means “undulating wave”. it’s like staring up from under the sea, or from beneath an undulating ice formation, except we are seeing a cloud rather than a solid or liquid.
They look ominous, but are rarely stormy. Why they form and what their pattern means? I haven’t been able to find anything. Can you?
(via APOD)

Stunning.

jtotheizzoe:

Lenticular and wave clouds are cool, but they don’t hold a candle to the undulatus asperatus clouds. Not new, but new to science, its Latin name means “undulating wave”. it’s like staring up from under the sea, or from beneath an undulating ice formation, except we are seeing a cloud rather than a solid or liquid.

They look ominous, but are rarely stormy. Why they form and what their pattern means? I haven’t been able to find anything. Can you?

(via APOD)

Posted on Tuesday, March 5th 2013

Reblogged from It's Okay To Be Smart

One of the great myths of the school system is that we tell people that everyone should learn exactly the same thing and exactly the same way, at roughly exactly the same speed. And that’s just not true. People learn in different ways, at different speeds, at different times. And so hacking your education allows you to learn what, when, how and where you want.

Dale J. Stephens, author of Hacking Your Education and founder of UnCollege.org

via NPR

Posted on Tuesday, March 5th 2013

Celestial inspiration will be no problem in 2013, thanks to NASA’s Astronomy Picture of the Day.

With the goal of helping us all “discover the cosmos”, NASA is releasing an incredible and little seen photograph of our universe each day, each stunning image is also accompanied by a brief but insightful explanation by a professional astronomer. 


From an astronaut fascinating self-portrait to a close-up look at Saturn, this website is a treasure trove for both outer-space enthusiasts and photographers alike. 

Click through the archives for some serious astronomy eye candies and learn something about our universe at the same time. 

via Design Taxi

Posted on Wednesday, December 26th 2012

Nine Dangerous Things You Learned In School

We live in an exciting and interesting time — one when some of our most commonly accepted ideas, traditions and principals are being challenged. This past week featured a fascinating read in the Wall Street Journal asking “Are Playgrounds Too Safe?”, making the case that “decades of dumbed-down playgrounds, fueled by fears of litigation, concerns about injury and worrywart helicopter parents, have led to cookie-cutter equipment that offers little thrill.” The result being children less compelled to play outside, potentially stunting emotional and physical development and exacerbating a nationwide epidemic of childhood obesity.

Recently Forbes featured an article smartly challenging things many of us grew up being taught and often adhere to still. But in today’s world, the rules of our parents’ past are ones we have to ask in all earnest and respect — do these rules still apply?

1. The people in charge have all the answers.
That’s why they are so wealthy and happy and healthy and powerful—ask any teacher. 

2. Learning ends when you leave the classroom. 
Your fort building, trail forging, frog catching, friend making, game playing, and drawing won’t earn you any extra credit. Just watch TV. 

3. The best and brightest follow all the rules.
You will be rewarded for your subordination, just not as much as your superiors, who, of course, have their own rules.

…More

Posted on Sunday, November 25th 2012

Thanksgiving Dinner: History Designed It, And Top Chef’s Tom Colicchio Critiques It

Long Read via Fast Company Design

Forget what your kindergarten teacher taught you; there’s no such thing as the original Thanksgiving. “It’s a nice myth that was created in 1841,” says Andrew Smith, contributor to The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America, referencing the story we all know so well. “The Puritans—the pilgrims—they’d celebrate days of thanksgiving, but it was a day you spent in church thanking God for a bountiful harvest, or maybe a victory over the Indians. What you didn’t do was sit down and eat. That would be a frivolous activity.”

So where did Thanksgiving come from? Why are we eating this meal with our inlaws and second cousins?

…More

Posted on Wednesday, November 21st 2012

Makerbot 3D Photo Booth Creates Personal Portraits

Image via Core 77

If you’re in the NYC area, you’re in luck! As PSFK reported, “At the official launch of its NoHo store, Makerbot introduced its own 3D printing photo booth, taking photography beyond digital. While not as detailed as the one we recently profiled in Japan, users will get a monochrome version of their head.

Amazingly, the service costs a total of $25. Customers will sit in the booth for a $5 scan and pay an additional $20 to get their face printed. This initiative was made possible by collaborating with Shapeshot, a 3D printing company focused on applications that relate to personalization.”

Rad to own, a must to see. Visit Makerbot’s physical location at 298 Mulberry Street in Manhattan or visit the store’s website.

Posted on Wednesday, November 21st 2012